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Welcome to DARA.News

Welcome to DARA.News – Dry Cleaner Asset Restoration Association (DARA).  Our goal is to educate people about environmental issues arising from historic dry cleaners and how to mitigate them.  PCE is the chemical used in dry cleaning and many  dry cleaning facilities have soil and groundwater affected by PCE.  This website hopes to educate   different parties involved with commercial real estate that may be affected by PCE and other chlorinated solvents.  Through education we hope to assist businesses in beginning the process of environmental mitigation on their own before hiring a professional consultant.  DARA.News can help guide you and give you recommendations when a consultant is needed.  DARA.News is just a phone call away for questions at (949) 580-2800.

Register with us under the Register tab so that we can provide you with custom information and special updates relevant to your interest.  Our email news will contain additional information that may not be on this web page.

Environmental

PCE in Groundwater Can be Stopped Before Impacting Public Supply Wells

Tetrachloroethylene is called PCE and it is widely used for dry-cleaning fabrics.  PCE is stored in drums, tanks, and used in dry cleaning machines. Before it was regulated, PCE was used as a de-greaser and equipment cleaner.  In the old days, it was commonly thrown out the back door in

What is PCE and How Did It Get Here?

PCE is tetrachloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which is a manufactured chemical that does not occur in the natural environment.  PCE was widely used as a metal degreaser by the military and industry since the 1940’s.  Later, PCE was also used in dry cleaning practices.  According to the California State Water

What is PCE and What are the Threats of PCE?

Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), is a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaning and industrial operations.  It is also known as tetrachloroethene, or perchloroethylene (PERC).  If inadvertently spilled or leaked onto the ground surface, it can get into the soil and groundwater.  PCE does not degrade quickly and can remain in the subsurface

Dry Cleaners

What is PCE and How Did It Get Here?

PCE is tetrachloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which is a manufactured chemical that does not occur in the natural environment.  PCE was widely used as a metal degreaser by the military and industry since the 1940’s.  Later, PCE was also used in dry cleaning practices.  According to the California State Water

What is PCE and What are the Threats of PCE?

Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), is a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaning and industrial operations.  It is also known as tetrachloroethene, or perchloroethylene (PERC).  If inadvertently spilled or leaked onto the ground surface, it can get into the soil and groundwater.  PCE does not degrade quickly and can remain in the subsurface

Dry Cleaner Beginnings

Dry cleaning was once widely known as French cleaning because the process was invented by a Frenchman in the mid-1800’s who reportedly noticed that when a kerosene lamp was overturned on a tablecloth, the cloth was rendered remarkably clean. He began experimenting with solvents, and French cleaning was born. The

Property Owners

Keep Certificates of Insurance

Prior to about 1987, general liability insurance policies on dry cleaners included the cost of environmental liability and cleanup.  If property owners collected certificates of additionally insured from the dry cleaner businesses then it is possible they can file a claim now for environmental cleanup.  After 1987 the insurance companies

PCE in Groundwater Can be Stopped Before Impacting Public Supply Wells

Tetrachloroethylene is called PCE and it is widely used for dry-cleaning fabrics.  PCE is stored in drums, tanks, and used in dry cleaning machines. Before it was regulated, PCE was used as a de-greaser and equipment cleaner.  In the old days, it was commonly thrown out the back door in

What is PCE and How Did It Get Here?

PCE is tetrachloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which is a manufactured chemical that does not occur in the natural environment.  PCE was widely used as a metal degreaser by the military and industry since the 1940’s.  Later, PCE was also used in dry cleaning practices.  According to the California State Water

What is PCE and What are the Threats of PCE?

Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), is a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaning and industrial operations.  It is also known as tetrachloroethene, or perchloroethylene (PERC).  If inadvertently spilled or leaked onto the ground surface, it can get into the soil and groundwater.  PCE does not degrade quickly and can remain in the subsurface

Realtors

What is PCE and How Did It Get Here?

PCE is tetrachloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which is a manufactured chemical that does not occur in the natural environment.  PCE was widely used as a metal degreaser by the military and industry since the 1940’s.  Later, PCE was also used in dry cleaning practices.  According to the California State Water

What Happens when Contamination isn’t Identified in a Phase I?

California specifies the requirements and protocol for Phase I environmental site assessments in ASTM E1527 but even with the process outlined in detail, sometimes information is missed and a contaminated property is transferred from a seller to a buyer.  There are horror stories of Phase I consultants missing information about

Developers

What is PCE and How Did It Get Here?

PCE is tetrachloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent, which is a manufactured chemical that does not occur in the natural environment.  PCE was widely used as a metal degreaser by the military and industry since the 1940’s.  Later, PCE was also used in dry cleaning practices.  According to the California State Water

What is PCE and What are the Threats of PCE?

Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), is a chlorinated solvent used in dry cleaning and industrial operations.  It is also known as tetrachloroethene, or perchloroethylene (PERC).  If inadvertently spilled or leaked onto the ground surface, it can get into the soil and groundwater.  PCE does not degrade quickly and can remain in the subsurface

Investors

Keep Certificates of Insurance

Prior to about 1987, general liability insurance policies on dry cleaners included the cost of environmental liability and cleanup.  If property owners collected certificates of additionally insured from the dry cleaner businesses then it is possible they can file a claim now for environmental cleanup.  After 1987 the insurance companies

Protect Your Investment with a Phase I Investigation

If you are investing in commercial real estate, it is best to investigate its past uses before you buy.  Most banks and lenders require that a Phase I environmental site assessment is done to identify areas of potential contamination.  Then as potential threats are identified, a Phase II investigation of

DARA.News now has an online shop where you can buy a PCE Detector and supplies. See the Shop link on the menu bar.Read More →

Check back frequently as we are continuing to add supplies to our online store!

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